KuberDock and Docker Blog

End-of-sale & end-of-life announcement for KuberDock

End-of-sale & end-of-life announcement for KuberDock

We at CloudLinux strive to provide our partners and customers with the most valuable and dependable solutions available. Unfortunately, at this time, we have decided to end sales and support for one of our products, KuberDock. After an extensive research, speaking with our customers, and re-evaluating the technology and the market, we have decided that additional investment into KuberDock’s development is not viable.

The decision to discontinue KuberDock did not come lightly and was based on several factors. Docker technologies still show significant momentum, but despite this high potential, its adoption in the hosting industry was considerably lower than expected. Prepackaged Docker applications have not proven to be easily understood and consumed by the typical end-user. We have seen this across all of our KuberDock customers - marketing new applications to their customers proved to be a much more difficult task given the state of this mature and competitive industry. We understand that you have invested resources in offering KuberDock-based solutions, and we apologize for this inconvenience.

Please note important dates for this EOS/EOL process:

Technical Support:

In order to help you manage the end-of-life transition, we will continue full 24x7 support of KuberDock until January 31st, 2017. After that date, and for the next three months until April 30th, we will provide limited support with response times of up to 2 business days.

Sales and Ordering:

As of Thursday, January 26th 2017, KuberDock will no longer be offered for sale. The ability to try and/or purchase it will be removed from our website and the CLN shortly. 

Software Development:

We are stopping the development of the KuberDock platform effective immediately. The product is now free for the current KuberDock customers and can be used indefinitely (without support beyond the next 3 months). We are tentatively planning to make the platform available on GitHub as an Open Source solution sometime in February. All our KuberDock developers will be transitioned to various teams to continue improvement of our flagship products, CloudLinux OS and KernelCare, as well as rapidly expand the development of the new Imunify360.

Again, we apologize for any inconvenience that this may have caused you, but we hope you understand why we had to come to this difficult but necessary decision. Please feel free to contact us at sales [at] cloudlinux.com with any questions you may have.

Sincerely,
Igor Seletskiy
CloudLinux CEO

Topic: KuberDock & Docker Blog

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Comments (26)

 
by Igor Seletskiy / Thursday, 09 February 2017 14:01

This is anything but management. Any regular end user after installing docker container will spend hours of your support time asking questions on how to connect & manage whatever they installed in docker...

This is anything but management. Any regular end user after installing docker container will spend hours of your support time asking questions on how to connect & manage whatever they installed in docker...
by Guest - Richard / Thursday, 09 February 2017 14:14

We would limit the available images to ones for which we give propper documentation and have tested ourselves.

I would be worried aboth one thing in plesk's version is that I presume the random mapped port would be accessible by everyone. That's where cloudlinux would be good at it using virtual networks.

We would limit the available images to ones for which we give propper documentation and have tested ourselves. I would be worried aboth one thing in plesk's version is that I presume the random mapped port would be accessible by everyone. That's where cloudlinux would be good at it using virtual networks.
by Guest - Erno Räsänen / Thursday, 09 February 2017 14:14

I Agree with Igor that the whole concept of Docker is way too complicated to end users - install scripts like Softaculous and Installatron are more than enough for 90% of end users.

However, IMO market for KuberDock was for application development companies who do their in-house devel ops on docker and after that want easy transition from development to production.

For that purpose Kuberdock was perfect match and would have allowed us smaller hosters to compete with the big guys like Google, Amazon etc.

I Agree with Igor that the whole concept of Docker is way too complicated to end users - install scripts like Softaculous and Installatron are more than enough for 90% of end users. However, IMO market for KuberDock was for application development companies who do their in-house devel ops on docker and after that want easy transition from development to production. For that purpose Kuberdock was perfect match and would have allowed us smaller hosters to compete with the big guys like Google, Amazon etc.
by Guest - Christos Tsafaroglou / Tuesday, 14 February 2017 17:12

I remember when Igor said in his presentation that the market was in SaaS and not in resources themselves. I have discussed it many times about it with people in Cloudlinux. In my humble opinion forming a dedicated cloudlinux team to create app images with more goodies (ssl ready, nginx+php_fpm, smtp ready, ready config files on persistant disk) might have attract more people to switch from shared hosting to dedicated application hosting. In any case i was sad to see Kuberdock end of life. I still believe it is better/easier for end user than VPS or VM hosting.

Thank you Cloudlinux for your great support.

I remember when Igor said in his presentation that the market was in SaaS and not in resources themselves. I have discussed it many times about it with people in Cloudlinux. In my humble opinion forming a dedicated cloudlinux team to create app images with more goodies (ssl ready, nginx+php_fpm, smtp ready, ready config files on persistant disk) might have attract more people to switch from shared hosting to dedicated application hosting. In any case i was sad to see Kuberdock end of life. I still believe it is better/easier for end user than VPS or VM hosting. Thank you Cloudlinux for your great support.
by Guest - ylluminate / Friday, 17 February 2017 19:59

As a developer AND hosting provider, we have been looking for a way to handle simple hosting such as WordPress in the traditional way, while also being able to support customers who run Ruby on Rails applications. We have struggled with cPanel since there has never really been any attention to this.

We have been about to change gears from a dedicated hosting scenario over to a bunch of smaller Linode servers. Now I've discovered KuberDock and it looks like you've just shut it down, BUT I have found that you've published the source here:
https://github.com/cloudlinux/kuberdock-platform

Does you platform allow control over deployment and integration into the customer panel of things such as Dokku on Docker with cPanel?

As a developer AND hosting provider, we have been looking for a way to handle simple hosting such as WordPress in the traditional way, while also being able to support customers who run Ruby on Rails applications. We have struggled with cPanel since there has never really been any attention to this. We have been about to change gears from a dedicated hosting scenario over to a bunch of smaller Linode servers. Now I've discovered KuberDock and it looks like you've just shut it down, BUT I have found that you've published the source here: https://github.com/cloudlinux/kuberdock-platform Does you platform allow control over deployment and integration into the customer panel of things such as Dokku on Docker with cPanel?
by Guest - VW / Wednesday, 29 March 2017 07:51

I’m surprised some of you didn’t saw this coming. Really? LVE is a sense a micro container already, while more basic it works and solves some problems that providers had.

Did you honestly imagined that a very basic beta software like Kuberdock which was expensive as well could compete with something like Rancher that can scale, cluster and do every possible trick you can wish. Did I mention its free as beer? Open source?
There was no chance for Kuberdock here and I’m shocked Igor didn’t saw this coming before investing in something like Kuberdock. But this is not the main reason I think.

Let’s see…Plesk has Docker containers already !!!

How long do you guys expect until cPanel builds Docker into their software? There is already the feature request under consideration. Well since most of the CloudLinux customer base is using cPanel that means they would just use cPanel for their containers.
And Igor is right, selling containers alone makes no sense unless you are Google or Amazon and your 512 GB RAM servers costs you 5 cent a month to run. You can’t compete selling infrastructure. Kuberdock was positioned to sell apps. Price was way off because and it didn’t allowed a flexible pricing per app either. Not to mention that containers like Docker still have their share of problems. Yes, even now in 2017 they are not completely stable or secure.

Then you have OnApp and like other 5 or 10 better platforms doing containers as well. Even so, the market is not adopting containers. It’s like the new domain extensions. More gimmick than anything else. Of course, containers work but not for the type of hosting providers CloudLinux is targeting. I suspected this for months already last year and I congratulate Igor for being honest and just pull the plug immediately vs taking customers money for something they knew was not going to fail hard. I also thing this heavily affected CloudLinux development which was somehow stalled last year. Now it’s slowly speeding up again.

First biggest mistake from CloudLinux was trying to solve a problem that didn’t exist in the first place. More when CloudLinux solved the problems that most shared providers had already. They were trying to compete against their own product.

I’m surprised some of you didn’t saw this coming. Really? LVE is a sense a micro container already, while more basic it works and solves some problems that providers had. Did you honestly imagined that a very basic beta software like Kuberdock which was expensive as well could compete with something like Rancher that can scale, cluster and do every possible trick you can wish. Did I mention its free as beer? Open source? There was no chance for Kuberdock here and I’m shocked Igor didn’t saw this coming before investing in something like Kuberdock. But this is not the main reason I think. Let’s see…Plesk has Docker containers already !!! How long do you guys expect until cPanel builds Docker into their software? There is already the feature request under consideration. Well since most of the CloudLinux customer base is using cPanel that means they would just use cPanel for their containers. And Igor is right, selling containers alone makes no sense unless you are Google or Amazon and your 512 GB RAM servers costs you 5 cent a month to run. You can’t compete selling infrastructure. Kuberdock was positioned to sell apps. Price was way off because and it didn’t allowed a flexible pricing per app either. Not to mention that containers like Docker still have their share of problems. Yes, even now in 2017 they are not completely stable or secure. Then you have OnApp and like other 5 or 10 better platforms doing containers as well. Even so, the market is not adopting containers. It’s like the new domain extensions. More gimmick than anything else. Of course, containers work but not for the type of hosting providers CloudLinux is targeting. I suspected this for months already last year and I congratulate Igor for being honest and just pull the plug immediately vs taking customers money for something they knew was not going to fail hard. I also thing this heavily affected CloudLinux development which was somehow stalled last year. Now it’s slowly speeding up again. First biggest mistake from CloudLinux was trying to solve a problem that didn’t exist in the first place. More when CloudLinux solved the problems that most shared providers had already. They were trying to compete against their own product.
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